Myth Vs. Fact

Myth:


There's something wrong with me because I haven't decided what I want to major in and what career I want for the rest of my life.

Fact:


Pushing yourself to make decisions without knowing what you really need and want will waste your time in the long run. It's your life, and choosing a career is a complex process that takes time.

 

Realistic Goal


Through listening to yourself and others, discover what you really want and what you're really able to do. Don't worry about what others want for you, or what you think you should want or should be able to do.

 

 

Myth:

My degree is my ticket to the life I want.

Fact:

Your degree is nothing more than another label, like a major-a certificate that you fulfilled a certain number of requirements. What you can do with it depends on how good an education you've had-how much you've learned about yourself, your options, and your world.

 

Realistic Goal

Learn how to effectively express and present yourself, your strengths, and your abilities, so you can move from graduation to a successful career.

 

 

"In order that people may be happy in their work, these three things are needed. They must be fit for it.  They must not do too much of it. And they must have a sense of success in it." -John Ruskin

 

 

Myth:

My employer will give me on-the-job training; all I need to worry about are my courses and grades.
Fact:

College offers you many chances to learn what it's like to work and do a job in your career field. Although some employers do give new employees on-the-job training, many companies do not give such training. These companies want their new employees to be able to do the job, to know what they want and how to fit in, and that you've tested yourself - that you aren't just book learned and bluster.

 

Realistic Goal

Use every opportunity the college and community offers to gain experience that will test your interests and preparation, help you impress a prospective employer, and give you a head start on a satisfying career.

 

 

Adapted from D. Crockett, Advising Skills, Techniques, and Resources.

 

 

"Blessed is he who has found his work; let him ask no other blessedness." -Thomas Carlyle

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